Mosquito Control

In light of news concerning the spread of Zika virus TO Texas, and West Nile virus IN Texas, it is important to educate yourself about mosquito-borne diseases.

The Texas Department of State Health Services website has detailed information about the Zika virus and how it is spread, its symptoms, precautions for travelers and those pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant.
 

Limit the Mosquito Population


The best way to limit the mosquito population is to remove their breeding medium - standing water.  We strongly encourage residents to reduce mosquitoes around their homes, yards and businesses by doing the following:
  
  • Get rid of old tires, can, bottles, buckets, drums and other containers in your yard or keep them empty of standing water
  • Empty wading pools frequently and store them when not in use
  • Repair leaky pipes and outside faucets
  • Change water in bird baths and scrub them twice a week
  • If you have pet water bowls, empty and refill them daily
  • Clean clogged roof gutters and drain flat roofs
  • Treat standing water that can't be drained with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), available at most home and garden stores (commonly called mosquito dunks)

Protect Yourself

  • Make sure window and door screens are "bug tight"
  • Be aware that the virus can be transmitted via sexual activity with an exposed person
  •  When outdoors wear protective clothing, use insect repellent with the active ingredient DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus to avoid mosquito bites

 

The City Does Not Spray for Mosquitoes


There are many reasons, but the most important ones are the questions about the effectiveness of the insecticide and the negative impact on the environment.
Because of these concerns the City promotes the importance of preventing mosquitoes at their source and wearing insect repellent to prevent bites.
Spraying chemicals in New Braunfels would not rid the city of mosquitoes. 
To kill a mosquito, the chemical has to actually make contact with the insect.  This may work for a swarm of mosquitoes in a wide-open space with no wind.  However, driving a truck down a neighborhood street to spray will do little to kill mosquitoes hiding in grass, bushes, trees and backyards.
Not only is spraying costly and ineffective, there may be serious environmental impacts caused by the chemicals. 
Spraying also does nothing to affect the larva present in standing water.  The spraying of chemicals also has the potential of contaminating our waterways, killing the beneficial fish and organisms that feed on mosquito larva, adding harmful volatile organic chemicals to the atmosphere and providing a potential inhalation or ingestion hazard to residents who are in affected areas shortly after spraying occurs.
Residents themselves are the best defense against mosquito infestation by using the steps outlined above. 
Thousands of mosquitoes can hatch from a single puddle of water that is stagnant for at least four days.


Public/Private Property


The City has an on-going program of treating standing water on public property with mosquito dunks where it is not feasible to drain the water. 
The City cannot treat standing water on private property, with the exception of abandoned property with due notice provided to the legal owners.
If you are concerned about a location having the potential for mosquito breeding please call Streets and Drainage Department at (830) 221-4030 between 7:00 am and 4:00 pm Monday – Friday or use our Report a Problem form. Please have the street address available when you call.